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Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

2 edition of removal of dye from effluent using adsorption processes. found in the catalog.

removal of dye from effluent using adsorption processes.

Andrew Gerard Sweeney

removal of dye from effluent using adsorption processes.

by Andrew Gerard Sweeney

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  • 16 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis(Ph.D.)--The Queen"s University of Belfast, 1980.

The Physical Object
Pagination1 v
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20330774M

Removal of basic dye from waste-water using silica as adsorbent 85 that adsorption of the dye can be brought about with relative ease by passing a dilute aqueous solution of an electrolyte, such as KCI. Detailed study o f adsorption kinetics and economic regeneration of the adsorbent is under progress. 7,¢ "7 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS J o 45"C. Remediation of dyes from industrial wastewater using low-cost adsorbents Abu Nasar, Sadia Shakoor Water pollution is one of the leading environmental issue triggering serious problems for living organisms. Various toxic substances are being introduced into the water bodies from various human activities and the removal of such substances from the water and wastewater has become [ ].

Adsorption process is adopted for removal of direct red 23 dye from the dye effluent using rice husk as the adsorbent in treated and untreated form. The process involves: washing and drying of rice husk at °C, followed by soaking in M citric acid for 2 hours and heated to °C.   1. Dye removal from waste water by using low cost adsorbent: A review Submitted to National Conference on Emerging Research Trends in Engineering Paper ID - Chemical Engineering Department Vishwakarma Government Engineering College Chandkheda Year: – 2. Contents 1. Introduction 2. Adsorption 3. Adsorbent 4. Literature.

Dye removal techniques The removal of the coloring matter from effluent is a major problem faced by industries. In general, the chemical structure of dyes contains conjugated double bonds and aromatic rings. Many synthetic dyes tend to persist in the environment due to the inherent stability of their molecular structure. Azo dyes for example have a. Similarly, during colour removal from textile effluent, it was found that % dye adsorption increased with increase in the addition of dead biomass (%w/v) again confirming that dye adsorption is adsorbent dependent. After dye uptake from textile effluent by dead microbial mass the reduc-tion in TDS was %, BOD was % and COD %.


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Removal of dye from effluent using adsorption processes by Andrew Gerard Sweeney Download PDF EPUB FB2

The adsorption process is being extensively used for the removal of dyes from synthetic dyehouse effluents by various researchers. The most widely used adsorbent is commercially available.

g per mL dye solution, respectively, for all batch tests in this experiment. Fig. 2 presents the results of the effect of the solution pH on the anthraquinone blue dye removal efficiencies for Fe 2 O 3 powder. As shown in Fig.

2, removal of dye decreased from 88 File Size: KB. The influence of pH on dye removal was not significant and the adsorption capacity increased with increase in temperature. A portion of the dye was recovered from the spent carbon using 50% acetic.

The adsorption process is being extensively used for the removal of dyes from dye house effluents by various researchers.

The most widely used adsorbent is commercially available activated carbon. Despite the frequent use of adsorption in wastewater treatment systems, commercially available activated carbon remains an expensiveFile Size: KB. Yagub et al. studied the effect of initial dye concentration on the adsorption of methylene blue (MB) by pine leaves and they noticed that as the initial dye concentration increased from 10 to 90 mg/L, the percentage of dye removal decreased from to % on increasing the initial dye concentration from 10 to 90 mg/L after min.

Fig. 2 Cited by: chitin, clay, and others can be used. Adsorption using activated carbon is rapidly becoming a prominent method of treating aqueous effluents and has been used in the industrial processes for variety of separation and purification techniques.

Furthermore, activated carbon is used as adsorbent for dye removal from wastewater. Water Research Vol. 10, pp. to Pergamon Press Printed in Great Britain.

THE REMOVAL OF ACID DYE FROM EFFLUENT USING NATURAL ADSORBENTS--II WOOD V. POOTS, G. McKAY and J. HEALY Department of Industrial Chemistry, The Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (Received 22 February ) Abstract--The ability of wood to adsorb.

Abstract— Dye removal from industrial effluents is an important environmental concern. Various physical and chemical treatment methods can serve this purpose, of which the most economical and effective one is adsorption. A variety of adsorbents are available naturally- bagasse, rice husk, neem.

Adsorptive Removal Of Dye From Industrial Dye Effluents Using Low-Cost Adsorbents: A Review Mehali J. Mehta1, Karishma K. Chorawala2 1 performance of the adsorption processes. REMOVAL OF BLUE DYE FROM WASTEWATER BY ADSORPTION ONTO ACTIVATED CARBON Prof.

Abass H. Sulaymon Asst. Prof. Mohammad A. Moslem Al-Tufaily Afrah A. Hassan Abstract: The aim of the present work is the adsorption of the blue dye from wastewater onto activated carbon by using continuous system (fixed-activated carbon bed).

negative surface charge density of coagulated dye sludge decreases and reaches a zero point around 50 mg/L in case of RB5 and 40 mg/L in case of AB1, where the best colour removal was achieved. The evident correlation between surface charge density and colour removal provides assumption that the adsorption of the positive coagulant species onto dye.

Many microbes of different taxonomic group of bacteria, fungi, and algae have been reported to enzymatically degrade dye molecules.

In addition, these types of biomasses have very high dye sorption capacity. Thus complete dye removal from the polluted water can be done by combining the bio-adsorption and bio-degradation processes. Hameed and El-Khaiary (b) for removal of cationic dye (Methylene blue) and adsorption capacity of mg g-1 was found.

It was noted that adsorption of dye decreases with an increase in the initial Methylene blue concentration. The adsorption of dyes was reported to follow Langmuir adsorption model and pseudo-first-order kinetic model. adsorption is an emerging field of research• The process of adsorption has an edge over other methods due to its sludge free clean operation and complete removal of dyes even from the dilute solutions.

The commonly used adsorbent for dye removal by adsorption is activated carbon89. However. Keywords: Dye removal, Adsorption, Biological, Chemical 1. INTRODUCTION Various treatment methods are available for the removal of dyes from the wastewater. Many chemical, physical and biological methods are generally used to remove dyes from the industrial effluent.

Various chemical methods are oxidative processes, H 2 O 2. Dye removal from textile wastewater has been a big challenge over the last decades.

The effectiveness of adsorption for dyes removal from wastewater has made it an ideal alternative to other expensive treatment methods.

This study inspects the possible use of chitin for the removal of dye from textile wastewater. Chitin was prepared. Hence, the removal of dyes from water/wastewater has gained a huge attention in recent years. So far, biological, chemical and physical methods are the traditional techniques, of which adsorption is found to be a more effective and cheap method for removing dyes.

Instead of using commercial activated carbon, the author of this book has worked on industrial waste material. In this book, locally available mangrove bark was studied for its potential use as an adsorbent for the removal of different types of dyes from aqueous solution. Factor affecting the efficiency of dyes removal were : Paperback.

The research was conducted to investigate the removal of dye effluent through adsorption process using local clays. The objective of the study are: 1. To study the effect of adding zeolite with clay, on adsorption process. To study the influence of pH toward dye removal performance. To determine the optimum shaking time of the adsorption.

Removal of Malachite Green from Water and Wastewater by Low-Cost Adsorbents Qasimullah, A. Mohammad, P.F. Rahman, M. Khan This chapter describes the use of various low-cost adsorbents for the removal of malachite green (MG) from water and wastewater.

Malachite green is a cationic dye which is widely used worldwide in the aquaculture industries (silk, wool, [ ]. most important environmental issues. Symptoms of coloured effluent affect the soil and ground water table, etc.

Adsorption technique is one of the most important technologies for the treatment of polluted water from colour, but seeking for the low-cost adsorbent is the target of this study.

Removal of colour studied using adsorbent prepared.The q parameter is known as Adsorption capacity and it was calculated by using the following formula: q = (C 0 - C) x V/m Where C 0 is the concentration at time zero and C is the concentration after the starting point (both in mg/L), m is the mass of the adsorption agent (g) and V is the volume (L) of the solution used to carry out the experiment.Removal of a cationic dye from wastewater by adsorption onto natural adsorbents H.

Ouasif 1*, S. Yousfi 1, M.L. Bouamrani 1, M. El Kouali 1, S. Benmokhtar 2, M. Talbi 1 1Labo r a to i edCh mAna lyq uP sic -Ch M éx,D p te nF cS ce B n M'Sik Casablanca, Maroc.

2Labo r ato i edR chC m-P y sq uG é nlMa x, D pa te Ch, F té S ie ces.